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Republic Wireless' data usage app

Another unlimited mobile data option just bit the dust... although it's not quite as bad as it sounds. Republic Wireless has switched from offering unlimited cellular data on its higher-priced phone tiers to a Refund Plan that shares more than a little in common with Google's Project Fi. You start with a base $10 plan, and add data depending on how much you expect to use -- you get money back, and pay $15 per extra gigabyte if you run over. The add-ons start at a modest $7.50 for 500MB and peak at $45 for 3GB, so you won't pay much at all unless you regularly underestimate your needs.

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Showtime stand-alone on many devices

Eager to watch shows like Penny Dreadful or Ray Donovan without either subscribing to cable or buying the shows outright? You can, if you live in the US. Showtime has launched its promised stand-alone streaming service on Apple devices and Roku players for $11 per month, and you can also access it through either Hulu or PlayStation Vue. Sign up and you'll have both on-demand access as well as live access to both East and West coast feeds, preventing your New York friends from spoiling the plot when you live in California. There's no mention of when the dedicated Android, console and smart TV apps are coming. Still, you now have one more way to watch a premium TV channel after you've cut the cord.

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You know that you need the latest game consoles (or a good PC) to get better graphics and special features, but it now looks like you'll need them if you want to see a game's extended storyline, too. BioWare has quietly posted word that "all future" downloadable content Dragon Age Inquisition will only be available for the PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. There's a save importer arriving this month that will transfer your progress if you buy both a new system and a fresh copy of Inquisition, but you're otherwise stuck if you've poured all your energy into the role-playing title on a PS3 or Xbox 360.

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Just like Twitter and Facebook, Tinder is stepping into verified profiles for "notable public figures." Those semi-celebrities will get a blue check mark on their profiles and, consequently, perhaps more attention than they'd like. Tinder announced last year that it was exploring verified profiles for celebrities, but it looks like the feature has taken a while to get up and runnnig. The company isn't offering up any details on how people can sign up for verified profiles, but former CEO Sean Rad hinted that it might be best on your Facebook verification status. We'll likely start hearing about the process from the Chosen Ones soon. Overall, it's a pretty unsurprising move for Tinder, since it will help prevent imposters from posing as notable people. But it'll be interesting to see how that little blue check mark starts affecting the service. Swipe right, and pray.

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Jolla Tablet

Jolla's mobile efforts have barely begun, but it's already shaking things up by splitting into two companies. From now on, Jolla Ltd. is focused solely on developing and licensing Sailfish OS, its custom mobile platform. It's forming a new, as yet unnamed firm this summer for its hardware business, which sees demand from the pro-privacy crowd. As newly appointed CEO Antti Saarnio puts it, the division is all about establishing a "clear focus" -- Jolla believes that it'll require total concentration on software to take advantage of "large opportunities" for licensing its mobile platform.

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A prototype wave generator called Azura is supplying grid power to Hawaii, the first time such a feat has been officially verified, according to the US Department of Energy (DoE). Though it can only produce 20 kilowatts, the DoE said that similar devices could eventually provide large amounts of clean power to coastal cities. The project is co-sponsored by the US Navy and was developed by an Oregon-based company called Northwest Energy Innovations (NWEI). It's located at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site in Kaneohe Bay in Oahu, at a depth of about 30 meters (100 feet).

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For decades now, Brits have been shooting amateur movies about their holidays, personal celebrations and experiences at huge, historic events. They're valuable snippets of UK history, but often they're never seen by the wider public. Today, the British Film Institute (BFI) is launching a project called "Britain on Film," which offers free online access to thousands of archived videos. Some were shot by amateurs, while others, such as this tour of Edinburgh by Sean Connery, were commissioned for professional projects. Roughly 2,500 film and TV titles are being released today, with 90 percent of them being free to watch. Many have never been seen before, or not since their first showing, and reveal unique, personal perspectives of how British life has changed over the years.

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Swimming with Withings' Activite watch

Most activity trackers and smartwatches won't monitor your swimming, and those that do usually require that you kick in a swimming mode before you dive in. Withings doesn't think you should have to switch things up just because you've left dry land, though. The health tech firm has added automatic swim detection to its Activité and Activité Pop watches, so you only need to start that breast stroke for it to register as a workout. You probably won't want to take your tracker on a deep scuba dive (both wearables are resistant down to 164 feet), but this could be very helpful if you'd rather hit the beach this summer than roast during a run.

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The changeover to smart homes seems inevitable, but you do have to make a reasonable investment in networked gear or you'll be stuck building a smart(ish) home one lonely, Bluetooth item at a time. This week, though, one lucky Engadget reader is going to get a boost into the future with a selection of Wink and other compatible smart home items. There's a Wink Relay so you don't always have to dig out your phone to control settings and a Wink Hub to unify the system -- compatible with WiFi, Z-wave, ZigBee and Bluetooth frequencies. That will cover the lamp dimmer, LED lightbulbs, connected lock and sensor pack in this prize bundle as well. If you get hooked, it's easy to expand your smart home's abilities by adding more items to the network as you go. All you need to do is head to the Rafflecopter widget below for up to three chances at winning this IoT starter pack courtesy of Wink.

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Not long after our last intimate chat with Shuhei Yoshida, the President of Sony Computer Entertainment's Worldwide Studios at E3, a Redditor managed to dig up a prototype of the never-released "Nintendo PlayStation" that eventually led to the birth of Sony's very own gaming console. Naturally, when we caught up with Shuhei-san again at a Project Morpheus event in Hong Kong, we showed him our article on the priceless gem and asked for his thoughts. After some reminiscent giggles, the exec gave a brief account on the time he spent with a device with matching description, as you can see in our interview video after the break.

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Microsoft 343 Industries Halo 5

In the early 2000s, four-player, split-screen Halo was a revelation for my then-girlfriend Jenn (who would later become my wife), her two sisters and me. It was amazing, frantic, swear-filled fun. Controllers were thrown; tempers flared. But that's all sadly in the past. Last week, Halo's current custodian, 343 Industries, revealed that it's abandoning local split-screen multiplayer and native LAN support for this fall's Halo 5: Guardians. We knew from earlier reports that local campaign co-op was out of the question, at least at launch, but the Ars Technica report confirms we won't see any split-screen multiplayer modes or native LAN support. Allow me to repeat: No local multiplayer. None. In a Halo game. For me, and likely many other longtime Halo fans, the news is a bitter pill to swallow.

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A visual tour of the Pokémon Research Lab

There's no better way to inspire children into a career in animal taxonomy and species classification than Pokémon. Possibly. A temporary Pokémon Lab in Japan is opening its doors to wannabe researchers (and their parents), offering them a Poké ball and 12 different stations to test and identify the critter inside. Once you've derived the specific pocket monster (fortunately, at this junior research center, it's limited to a pool of around 30), there's also a healthy spoonful of real science and biology at the end -- oh yes, it's edu-tainment. This part of the exhibit tries to convey how important discoveries have occurred through observation and categorization of animals and creatures (the game's creator was famously fascinated by categorizing insects as a child). There was also a giant Pikachu in a lab coat to assist where needed -- although he didn't really help all that much.

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